Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Energyboostersblog: 'Little Angels' Korean Dancers!

Energyboostersblog: 'Little Angels' Korean Dancers!: A member of the 'Little Angels', a Korean folk ballet group formed in 1962, performs in New Delhi on Tuesday.Conceptualized ...

Apple plans to set up its own stores in India if Govt eases local sourcing norms!

Apple Inc, the maker of iPhones and iPads, is evaluating the possibility of setting up its own stores in India, if the Indian government eases local sourcing conditions, said two senior executives who have business relations with the California-based company in India.

It might be easier for Apple, the world's most valuable company, to set up stores if the government allows its IT outsourcing operations in India to be included as part of the mandatory 30 per cent local sourcing requirement, the two executives said.

Apple refused to comment on its India plans or whether it would ask the government to provide flexibility with regard to local sourcing norms."We don't comment on rumours and speculation," said a company spokesman in reply to an email query.

Traditionally, India has not been a high-priority market for Apple, and it takes months before its newly-launched products start selling in India officially through re-sellers.
CEO Tim Cook had told analysts during a conference call two months back that the multi-layered distribution in India adds to the cost of bringing products to the Indian market.

But one of the executives mentioned above said the growing popularity of iPhones, iPads, and other Apple products in India was prompting the company to explore the option of increasing its engagement with the country.

"Undoubtedly, Apple is interested in setting up its own stores now that the demand for its product has increased. But it wants some flexibility in the 30 per cent sourcing norms. At present, it does not buy anything from India nor is it likely to source anything immediately, apart from IT services," one of the executives said, requesting anonymity.

Apple is famously secretive about its outsourcing contracts. Arecent media report said the company undertakes annual outsourcing projects worth Rs 500 crore from India and this is expected to rise significantly.

Like Apple, many electronics and high-end brands such as Sony and Rolex may want to set up stores of their own in India for better control and distribution, but the stiff sourcing norms have held them back. Typically, these companies make their wares in one or two countries from where they are shipped across the globe.

"To think that Rolex will suddenly start sourcing watch parts from India is absurd," said a person working on a few single-brand proposals said.

Diljeet Titus, senior partner at law firm Titus & Co, who is also working with single-brand foreign companies, including IKEA, said there is a way out for such marquee labels. "We will seek clarity from the government on whether a singlebrand retail company can fulfil the local sourcing condition by sourcing unrelated items, not core to its business, for exports to third parties. After all, the government's main intention is to augment manufacturing in the country and this clearly addresses the issue," he said, adding that one of his clients is ready for this option.

'English Vinglish' is film with a golden heart: Anupam Kher!

Actor Anupam Kher is highly impressed with Sridevi after watching the special screening of her comeback movie 'English Vinglish' and says that the film marks the return of the 'original queen of cinema'.

Ad filmmaker Gauri Shinde is making her directorial debut with the film - a story of an Indian housewife battling language problem in the US.

"With R. Balki, Gauri Shinde and Sri (devi) at the special screening of 'English Vinglish' in Delhi. Watch it for million reasons," Kher tweeted.

English Vinglish' is spectacularly beautiful. Film with a golden heart. Take a bow Gauri Shinde. Sridevi, original queen of cinema is back," he further tweeted.

This is Sridevi's first release in 15 years. Her last film was the 1997 hit family drama 'Judaai'.

Did you know?

Strong and Healthy Nails :

1. To keep your nails hydrated, rub a small amount of petroleum jelly into your cuticle and the skin surrounding your nails every evening before you go to bed or whenever your nails feel dry. Keep a jar in your purse, desk drawer, car — anywhere you might need it. Not a fan of petroleum jelly? Substitute castor oil. It’s thick and contains vitamin E, which is great for your cuticles. Or head to your kitchen cupboard and grab the olive oil — it also works to moisturize your nails.

2. Wear rubber gloves whenever you do housework or wash dishes. Most household chores, from gardening to scrubbing the bathroom to washing dishes, are murderous on your nails. To protect your digits from dirt and harsh cleaners, cover them with vinyl gloves whenever it’s chore time. And for extra hand softness, apply hand cream before you put on the rubber gloves.

3. When pushing back your cuticles (it is not necessary to cut them) come in at a 45-degree angle and be very gentle. Otherwise the cuticle will become damaged, weakening the entire nail, says Mariana Diaconescu, manicurist at the Pierre Michel Salon in New York City.

4. Trim your toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails. This is particularly important if you have diabetes.

5. Dry your hands for at least two minutes after doing the dishes, taking a bath/shower, etc. Also dry your toes thoroughly after swimming or showering. Leaving them damp increases your risk of fungal infection.

6. Air out your work boots and athletic shoes. Better yet, keep two pairs and switch between them so you’re never putting your feet into damp, sweaty shoes, which could lead to fungal infections.

7. Wear 100 percent cotton socks. They’re best for absorbing dampness, thus preventing fungal infections.

8. Stretch out the beauty of a manicure by applying a fresh top coat every day, says Susie Galvez, owner of Face Works Day Spa in Richmond, Virginia, and author of Hello Beautiful: 365 Ways to Be Even More Beautiful.

9. Make your nails as strong as a horse’s hooves, and take 300 micrograms of the B vitamin biotin four to six times a day. Long ago, veterinarians discovered that biotin strengthened horses’ hooves, which are made from keratin, the same substance in human nails. Swiss researchers found that people who took 2.5 milligrams of biotin a day for 5.5 months had firmer, harder nails. In a U.S. study, 63 percent of people taking biotin for brittle nails experienced an improvement.

10. Add a glass of milk and a hard-boiled egg to your daily diet. Rich in zinc, they’ll do wonders for your nails, especially if your nails are spotted with white, a sign of low zinc intake.

11. File your nails correctly. To keep your nails at their strongest, avoid filing in a back-and-forth motion — only go in one direction. And never file just after you’ve gotten out of a shower or bath — wet nails break more easily.

12. Massage your nails to keep them extra strong and shiny. Nails buffing increases blood supply to the nail, which stimulates the matrix of the nail to grow, says Galvez.

13. Polish your nails, even if it’s just with a clear coat. It protects your nails, says manicurist Diaconescu. If you prefer color, use a base coat, two thin coats of color, and a top coat. Color should last at least seven days but should be removed after 10 days.

14. Avoid polish removers with acetone or formaldehyde. They’re terribly drying to nails, says Andrea Lynn Cambio, M.D., a New York City dermatologist. Use acetate-based removers instead.

Monday, October 1, 2012

Fish getting smaller as oceans become warmer!

A new study has warned that changes in ocean and climate systems could lead to smaller fish.

The study led by fisheries scientists at the University of British Columbia provides the first-ever global projection of the potential reduction in the maximum size of fish in a warmer and less-oxygenated ocean.

The researchers used computer modeling to study more than 600 species of fish from oceans around the world and found that the maximum body weight they can reach could decline by 14-20 per cent between years 2000 and 2050, with the tropics being one of the most impacted regions.

"We were surprised to see such a large decrease in fish size," said the study's lead author William Cheung, an assistant professor at the UBC Fisheries Centre.

"Marine fish are generally known to respond to climate change through changing distribution and seasonality. But the unexpectedly big effect that climate change could have on body size suggests that we may be missing a big piece of the puzzle of understanding climate change effects in the ocean," he noted.

This is the first global-scale application of the idea that fish growth is limited by oxygen supply, which was pioneered more than 30 years ago by Daniel Pauly, principal investigator with UBC's 'Sea Around Us Project' and the study's co-author.

"It's a constant challenge for fish to get enough oxygen from water to grow, and the situation gets worse as fish get bigger," explained Pauly.

"A warmer and less-oxygenated ocean, as predicted under climate change, would make it more difficult for bigger fish to get enough oxygen, which means they will stop growing sooner," he said.

This study highlights the need to curb greenhouse gas emissions and develop strategies to monitor and adapt to changes that we are already seeing, or we risk disruption of fisheries, food security and the way ocean ecosystems work.

Sridevi: I haven't done much as an actor!

It's hard to believe that it was 15 years ago when we last saw Sridevi on the big screen. It's like she hasn't aged at all.

The actress, who makes her comeback to the silver screen with Gauri Shinde's English Vinglish on October 5, insists that it is her debut film, not a comeback.

She looks particularly fresh and radiant as she arrives for the interview. I can't help but ask her about the secret behind her glow.

She says, "Love gives me the energy. There is no secret; whatever you are inside will reflect on your face. Just be happy and positive. Just look for the basic things every morning. You have to be happy from within and enjoy."

In conversation with Sonil Dedhia, Sridevi explains the reason behind her long haitus and reveals what prompted her to get back to films.

You are back on the silver screen after 15 years. Why such a long break?

I ask the same question: why 15 years? (laughs). I wish Gauri (Shinde, the director) had met me before; I would have done this movie at any given time.

My fans used to always ask me, 'When will we see you?' I am so glad and thankful to my fans that I was always there in their hearts and they never forgot me.

Did you miss acting?

No. I was happy to spend time with my children and my husband. I was enjoying motherhood.

At the same time I never lost touch with films. As a producer's wife I was happy being behind the camera. I would often go on the sets to watch a shoot.

Saturday, September 29, 2012

Heart-friendly foods and enemies of the heart!

Heart-friendly foods and enemies of the heart Gone are the days when heart ailments were considered to be an old age disease. Today, people in the prime of their lives are suffering from the impact of an unhealthy lifestyle and bad eating habits.

We have read enough about how you should exercise, get proper sleep and lead a healthy lifestyle but what we don't realize is, how crucial a role diet plays. Before you look into what to stock up and what to throw out of the window, keep in mind, "He who can believe himself well, will be well." - Ovid

The enemies of the heart are those foods that increase your cholesterol levels, as they tend to be calorie-heavy too. So here is what you need to avoid:

Trans Fat
Trans fat is the biggest culprit. However, the question here is how can you eliminate trans fat from your diet? Simply by slashing foods that contain "hydrogenated oils" in their ingredients. So next time you go to that departmental store read labels carefully. Keep at an arm's distance packaged snacks and chips. Swapping full fat dairy products like milk and cheese with low/non fat options helps too.

Red meat
You might be a hardcore non-vegetarian but maybe it is time to make a change now. Red meat is known to have a whopping amount of saturated fat that raises your 'bad' LDL cholesterol level and has long been seen as unhealthy.

Eggs
This all time breakfast favorite can have more cholesterol than you'd ever imagine. Research proves that the more egg yolks you eat, the higher is the risk of inflammation of the arteries.

Salt and Sugar
Let's face it. We all crave for that sugary tart or a bite of the salt-crusted potatoes but have you ever thought how harmful it can be? Too much sodium and sugar intake is directly linked with higher blood pressures, as it retains the excess fluid in your body. The American Heart Association recommends consuming less than 1,500 mg of sodium in a day.

Now that you know what to cut off the menu, here are some heart friendly foods that you should gorge on:

Oats
Oats contain a type of fiber, which helps to bind bile acids and remove them from the body. These acids are made from cholesterol, thus oats aid in lowering the cholesterol levels in our body. Oats are also rich in Omega 3 fatty acids.

Nuts
Want a healthy heart? Trade your mid-meal snacks with a packet of assorted nuts. Once touted as high fat devils, today nuts are considered to be the super foods in promoting heart health. All nuts have high amounts of unsaturated fats, which is good for the heart as it helps in reducing the inflammation in the arteries. A handful of nuts every day, would help keep heart problems at bay!

Berries
Berries are the new power foods. Packed with anti-oxidants, they help to significantly reduce the blood pressure and boost the good HDL cholesterol levels, hence promoting a healthy heart. They are rich sources of powerful photo-chemicals that help in a having a better blood flow and fighting serious ailments.

Legumes
Eating legumes regularly is extremely heart healthy. The best ones are kidney beans, black beans and lentils. They are rich in soluble fibers that help to bind the cholesterol.  They are also rich in various nutrients like iron, calcium and protein thus help in maintaining a healthy heart. Like berries they also help in increasing the platelet activity.

Salmon
Salmon is a cold-water fish, with abundant amounts of omega 3 fatty acids, which are great to promote a healthy heart. It is very versatile and easy to cook too. No other common fish has such great amounts of omega 3 as salmon. A rich source of easily digestible protein, salmon aides in strengthening the heart muscles.

India’s heaviest satellite GSAT-10 launched!

GSAT-10, the country's newest and heaviest satellite, was launched in the wee hours of Saturday from the Kourou launchpad in French Guiana in South America. It will directly boost telecommunications and direct-to-home broadcasting among others. 

The satellite, 9th in ISRO's present fleet, will be operational in November and add 30 transponders to the domestic INSAT system, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said soon after the launch.
The ISRO launched the 3.4-tonne spacecraft on the European Ariane 5 rocket as the agency cannot currently launch satellites of such mass on its own vehicles. The satellite and the launch fee cost the agency Rs. 750 crore. 

The ISRO called its 101st mission "a grand success," adding that the satellite was in good health.
ISRO's Chairman and Secretary, Department of Space, Dr. K. Radhakrishnan, and senior scientists have been at the Master Control Facility, Hassan (some 80 km from Bangalore) since Friday evening. It is also the first time that the Chairman was not present at the launch site.Other Indian scientists present at Kourou included Director, Satellite communications, Prahlad Rao and Project Director T.K.Anuradha. 

What the satellite brings
It carries 30 communication transponders - 12 in Ku-band, 12 in C-band and six in extended C-band. The ISRO is currently leasing 95 foreign transpondes to meet domestic demand. The INSAT/GSAT system has 168 transponders. 

The Ku band is vital for seven DTH TV operators and thousands of VSAT operators who provide phone and Internet broadband connections. Public and private telephone and television providers also use the C band. 

GSAT-10 also has the second GAGAN payload which augments or finetunes the US GPS signals into far more accurate readings. GAGAN, a venture of the Department of Sapce and Airports authority of India, is primarily meant to benefit airlines and their aircraft flying into and out of India. GSAT-8, launched in May 2008, carried the first GAGAN payload. 

The flight at 2.58 a.m. IST was preceded by a countdown lasting for 11.5 hours. By 3.19 a.m. it was visible to scientists waiting to capture its signals at Hassan. 

"MCF took over command and control of the satellite immediately after the injection. Preliminary health checks on various subsystems such as power, thermal, command, sensors, control etc., have been performed and all parameters have been found to be satisfactory. The satellite has been oriented towards Earth and the Sun using the onboard propulsion systems," the agency said. 

In the coming days, MCF scientists will perform routine manoeuvres to "raise" the elliptical orbit into a circular orbit with 24-hour rotation around the Earth and fixed at 83 degrees East slot over the Indian region at 36,000 km above ground. They will do this by firing the apogee motors on board the satellite in three steps. Later the antenna, solar panels and other instruments will be deployed and switched on.

Oh My God: Akshay Kumar has third time luck in 2012!

It seems trade pundits were right when they declared in the beginning of 2012 that the year is going to belong to Akshay Kumar. The actor has again made his presence felt with 'Oh My God'. 

The film has opened to mainly positive reviews with most of the critics praising the film for its unique central theme. If 'OMG' becomes commercially successful then it will be Akshay's third hit film in the same year. 

Though Akshay Kumar is not the hero of the film but his cameo is worth watching. He is one of those under-rated actors of Bollywood who have done well in certain genres in the past but have never received the kind of appreciation they deserved. 

However, the situation has changed for Akshay in last couple of years. Due to a bankable niche audience base, he has emerged as one of the reliable actors for the producers. 

His last film 'Joker' bombed at the box office but prior to it he had given two big hits. 'Housefull 2' had a huge starcast but Akshay's comic skills made the film watchable. His return to action proved to be lucky in 'Rowdy Rathore'. The film set the cash registers ringing. 

'OMG' is getting good word of mouth publicity and is likely to attract more audiences during the weekend, and thus Akshay would be hoping for another hit in 2012.



Friday, September 28, 2012

World T20: Pakistan take on South Africa in Super Eights!

They have so far maintained a clean slate and there is very little to separate the two teams as South Africa lock horns with Pakistan in what is expected to be a battle of attrition in their ICC World Twenty20 Super Eight match here on Friday. Both teams will be equally confident after their emphatic showings in the group stage of the tournament, and it will be interesting to see who emerges winner at the R Premadasa Stadium stadium. 
 
Pakistan, winner of the 2009 edition, won both their group league matches with ease.If skipper Mohammad Hafeez and Nasir Jamshed shone in their win over New Zealand, Imran Nazir led the way with an onslaught that left the Bangladesh bowlers shell-shocked in their last game. 

Hafeez deserves mention as he led admirably with both bat and ball, with his canny off-spinners often proving to be a perfect foil for Saeed Ajmal, who has become a sort of a headache for batsmen the world over. 

Flashy wicketkeeper-batsman Kamran Akmal has also shown glimpses of his brilliance and looked in good nick against their South Asian rivals. 

Pacers Umar Gul and Sohail Tanvir haven't really fired, but Yasir Arafat made an impact with three Bangladeshi wickets, and Pakistan are unlikely to make any changes to the squad that played in the last game. 

The match assumes more significance for Pakistan as a win against the Proteas will put them in the perfect frame of mind ahead of the big-ticket encounter with arch-rival India on Sunday.South Africa have been in their consistent self in the group stage, but the real tournament starts now, and more so for the Proteas. 

The shocking 2011 World Cup quarter-final defeat to New Zealand still fresh in mind, South Africa once again would look to shed the tag of perennial chokers in ICC tournaments, and a win on Friday will be a positive step in that direction. 

A look at their performance in the group stage will only add to South Africa's confidence going into the competitive round.Led by the explosive AB de Villiers, the team hammered neighbours Zimbabwe by 10 wickets to start the tournament in the best possible manner.In the rain-reduced seven-over hit against hosts Sri Lanka, the Proteas were well served by the skipper, who helped them to a 32-run win in Hambantota. 

There is no dearth of strokemakers in the SA line-up and right from the in-form Hashim Amla to the great Jacques Kallis, each one of them is capable of single-handedly turning a match on its head.
The presence of Dale Steyn, Morne Morkel and his brother Albie make for an effective pace battery.
Probable XIs: 

Celkon launches SIM-based tablet!

Celkon Mobiles has launched a 7-inch SIM-based tablet that works on Android Ice Cream Sandwich Operating System. The Hyderabad-based mobile handset company forayed into the tablet business last month with an e-tab.
The sim-based CELTAB comes with 1 GHz Processor, 512 RAM and a provision for 3G dongle to access the Internet. ‘We have priced this tab at Rs 7,499. We will be coming out with two more tablets, including a 9-inch one, next week,” Y. Guru, Managing Director of Celkon Mobiles, said.
The company is offering in-built courseware for engineering and management graduates. “We are planning to add additional material to address the needs of students in other streams,” he told Business Line.
Overseas expansion
Celkon’s Executive Director, R. Murali, said the company plans to expand the business abroad in the fourth quarter of this financial year. “We are in talks with channel partners in Africa. We have started selling the handsets in Singapore in a small way. We will also be looking at Sri Lanka and Bangladesh,” he said.
He said the company would roll out a smartphone with dual-core processor in October, along with C-Note, both under Rs 10,000. “We are selling five lakh handsets a month. Of this, smartphones and tablets contribute 20 per cent. We expect the contribution from the latter segment to grow in the remaining two quarters as we launch new models and expand to new States,” he said.
In 2011-12, the company registered a turnover of Rs 326 crore. “With new smartphone range and tablets and expansion to new States would help us cross Rs 1,000-crore this financial year,” he said.

Nazis' stolen statue's cosmic link!

A thousand-year-old Buddhist statue taken from Tibet in 1938 by an SS team seeking the roots of Hitler's Aryan doctrine was carved from a meteorite, scientists have reported.
In a paper published in an academic journal, German and Austrian researchers recount an extraordinary tale where archaeology, the Third Reich and cosmic treasure are intertwined like an Indiana Jones movie.
Called the Iron Man because of the high content of iron in its rock, the 24-centimetre-high statue was brought to Germany by an expedition led by Ernst Schaefer, a zoologist and ethnologist.
Backed by SS chief Heinrich Himmler and heading a team whose members are all believed to have been SS, Schaefer roamed Tibet in 1938-9 to search for the origins of Aryanism, the notion of racial superiority that underpinned Nazism.
Weighing 10.6 kilos, the statue features the Buddhist god Vaisravana seated, with the palm of his right hand outstretched and pointing downwards.
Chemical analysis shows that the rock from which it was carved came from a meteorite.
The rock survived a long trip through the Solar System and the destructive friction with the atmosphere when it collided with Earth.
It is a particularly rare kind of meteorite called an ataxite, which has iron and high contents of nickel, according to the study, published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science.
"The statue was chiselled from an iron meteorite, from a fragment of the Chinga meteorite which crashed into the border areas between Mongolia and Siberia about 15,000 years ago," said investigator Elmar Buchner of Stuttgart University.
"While the first debris was officially discovered in 1913 by gold prospectors, we believe that this individual meteorite fragment was collected many centuries before."
The exact dating of the carving cannot be established accurately, but its style links it to the pre-Buddhist Bon culture of the 11th century.
Vaisravana was the Buddhist god-king of the North, also known as Jambhala in Tibet.
How Schaefer came across the statue is unclear, but the big appeal is likely to have been a large swastika, symbolising good fortune in Buddhism, carved on its chest.
Once the statue arrived in Munich, it became part of a private collection and only became available for study by Buchner following an auction in 2009.
Other meteorites have become incorporated into religious worship. The holy Black Stone in the Kaaba in Mecca is believed to be a stony meteorite.
"The Iron Man statue is the only known illustration of a human figure to be carved into a meteorite, which means we have nothing to compare it to when assessing value," said Buchner.
"Its origins alone may value it at US$20,000 (NZ$24,000). However, if our estimation of its age is correct and it is nearly a thousand years old it could be invaluable."

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

ONGC’s win not good enough!

ONGC did their part perfectly by beating Sporting Club de Goa in their final league encounter on Tuesday, but unfortunately that wasn't good enough for the Mumbai-outfit to progress to the semifinals of the 34th Federation Cup in Siliguri. With both teams looking for a victory to keep their chances alive, ONGC triumphed 2-1 at the SSB ground. But they required East Bengal to lose their final encounter to fellow-Kolkata outfit Kalighat Milan Sangha. Unfortunately, it wasn't to be as last year's runners-up registered a thrilling 4-3 win to set up a semi-final clash against Churchill Brothers.
In a match full of drama at the Kanchenjungha Stadium, East Bengal trailed twice to be 0-2 and 2-3 against the qualifiers Kalighat MS, but Edeh Chidi and youngster Manandeep Singh rose to the occasion with a brace each. 

Playing without their star central defender Uga Okpara, East Bengal conceded early goals as James Giblee (11th) and Tanmoy Kundu scored in a space of five minutes.East Bengal, however, kept attacking and got their first goal in the 30th minute when former Air-India striker Manandeep Singh, scored from an Orji Penn cross. 

Manandeep was once again in his elements to bring on the 2-2 equaliser when he scored this time from a Chidi cross. But their joy was short-lived as Nigerian Christopher Chizoba helped Kalighat restore the lead in the 40th minute. 

There was more drama in store as East Bengal made it 3-3 at the interval after Chidi was fouled inside the KMS box. The Nigerian converted the spot kick to add more spice as the match poised for an entertaining second-half. 

In an action replay, Chidi was again fouled inside KMS box and the result was no different as he fired in the winner from the spot, for a superb East Bengal turnaround. 

Sporting Clube found the going tough against ONGC from the very start as Tarif Ahmed and Lalmuanpuia scored fine goals. The Goan team scored their solitary goal through Dawson Fernandes.
East Bengal finished with seven points to top the group C table, while ONGC (six) and Sporting Clube (four) finished second and third respectively.I-League champions Dempo will take on defending champs Salgaocar in the other semi.

Got back pain? It could be your genes!

They play a “key role” in lumbar disc degeneration (LDD), for a long time suspected of being the number one cause of chronic lower back pain, according to specialists.
Over the years these discs, which cushion the vertebrae, can end up getting squashed and bulging out. Bony growths can also emerge from the spinal column itself. Both are thought to trigger back pain.
Scientists have now found that serious lumbar disc degeneration is inherited in 65 to 80 per cent of cases.
Dr Frances Williams, from the Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London, said: “The impact of hereditary factors on LDD is remarkably high. In the 70s and 80s the Scandinavians spent millions looking for all the occupations which caused back pain, but they couldn’t find them.”
Studies of identical twins who went into different professions - such as truck driving and being a PE teacher - showed both ended up with similarly bad lumbar disk degeneration in later life.

Dr Williams said genetic studies did not claim to reveal the whole picture, and said people should still take care of their general health to minimise the chance of back pain, in particular avoiding smoking and piling on the pounds.

She added: "Sitting up straight and exercising won't change the way your discs change, but they might help you develop good muscular strength to keep a pain-free spine and back."

Steve Tolan, a professional adviser at the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, said: “We have little control over the genes we are born with, but we can manage how we support our backs in other ways, such as exercise.

“This can prevent an existing condition from getting worse or delay the onset of a hereditary one. The majority of people should be using exercise and a healthy lifestyle to protect their backs against future injury.

“To use an analogy, it doesn’t matter what type of car you have, you still need to keep the engine maintained.”

Precious treasures at a height!

It was only a few years ago when I literally stumbled into the Tirthan Valley in Himachal Pradesh and found myself at a gateway leading to one of India’s ‘youngest’ national parks — The Great Himalayan National Park. A pair of White Capped Red Starts flitted along the banks of the Tirthan river which kept me company as I walked the 10 km stretch to the park entrance from where all the treks begin.
The park was officially declared in 1999, and has over the years expanded by incorporating adjoining ‘protected areas’ and wildlife parks into its fold, bringing the total area under administration to 1,171 sq km.
More recently, in 2010, both the Sainj and Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuaries were also added to the GHNP, but will only be formally incorporated once the process known as ‘settlement of rights’ is completed. Covering a large area, the GHNP is contiguous with the Pin Valley National Park (675 sq km) in Trans-Himalaya, the Rupi Bhabha Wildlife Sanctuary (503 sq km) in Sutlej watershed and the Kanawar Wildlife Sanctuary (61 sq km).
Such a large, unbroken and protected expanse of wilderness is like an Eden for flora and fauna to flourish. Geographically speaking, the park seems to encompass almost everything from dense oak and walnut forests, alpine valleys and meadows to patches of high altitude pink rhododendrons which finally give way to a treeless rocky and glacial terrain at 6,100 metres at it’s highest point.
The GHNP is a hotspot for biodiversity and is home to some of the most vulnerable and endangered species. In all, there are 375 recorded faunal species
within the park, a number which is likely to increase, as research and studies indicate. These include the Snow Leopard, the Himalayan Black and Brown Bear, the Royle’s Vole, the Himalayan Tahr, the leopard, the Himalayan Pit Viper, the Musk deer, the Monal and the Western Tragopan, to name just a few.
The Western Tragopan, which is also on the logo of the GHNP, is considered to be the rarest of pheasants in the world. Juju Rana, as it is locally known, literally translates as the king of birds. According to local legend, when the creator was making the world she decided to make something special. So she asked all the birds to give one feather each and from that she created the Juju Rana. It is this biodiversity and its uniqueness that has got the GHNP nominated to the status of a Unesco World Heritage Site.
Unesco will be evaluating the national park this coming month and consider awarding it the status of a World Heritage Site — a status which earlier this year the Western Ghats was awarded, but was declined by the Goa and the Karnataka Governments, presumably owing to the gigantic mining mafia that exists in the region. It is ironic that the very minerals and metals the human race is after are below the most pristine and ancient forests. To open up a forest to be scraped and gouged for mining is to seal not only the fate of the forest, but also everything around it and connected with it.
The GHNP has been nominated specifically under two criteria. The first criterion is that the site should contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic importance.
The second condition is that it should contain the most important and significant natural habitats for in situ conservation of biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding universal value from the point of view of science or conservation. The nomination itself is testimony to the fact that GHNP is amongst the top most biologically diverse and vital natural habitats on our planet.
Unfortunately, it is this very fact which is also one of the reasons why the GHNP is threatened. The forests with their diversity in both flora and fauna, have long been used by the communities that have lived in and around them. Local village communities used the meadows and wild lands to graze domestic cattle and sheep, collect forest produce, especially medicinal plants, and to hunt for wild meat in a sustainable manner.
The second half of this story is not new. Commercial gain comes sweeping in and turns everything inside out. Accelerating development, including mining, tourism, hydro-electric dams, timber/forest encroachment and even military use, are taking a toll on this protected habitat. One other activity which began small but has grown disturbingly fast to a vast scale is the illegal collection of medicinal plants.
During my time at the GHNP, I was told about how the demand for these medicinal plants comes from the cities and how then these plants are exported out of the country. The locals are shown photographs of the plant, fungus or root that is in demand, given a rate and sent out in hordes. The entire pipeline is extremely organised and run by a mafia.
The biggest demand these days is for a plant locally called Naag Chhatri. It is the root of the plant that is sought after. Needless to say, to harvest it the entire plant is killed. The plant itself is extremely medicinal in nature and is apparently used as a cure for everything — from fever to high blood pressure. The exact number of people involved is not known, but the quantities extracted from the forest are reportedly huge. So huge that it poses a very real threat to actually cause a local extinction of the species.
A space-time crystal, however, has only existed as a concept in the minds of theoretical scientists with no serious idea as to how to actually build one – until now. An international team of scientists led by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has proposed the experimental design of a space-time crystal based on an electric-field ion trap and the Coulomb repulsion of particles that carry the same electrical charge. "The electric field of the ion trap holds charged particles in place and Coulomb repulsion causes them to spontaneously form a spatial ring crystal," says Xiang Zhang, a faculty scientist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division who led this research. "Under the application of a weak static magnetic field, this ring-shaped ion crystal will begin a rotation that will never stop. The persistent rotation of trapped ions produces temporal order, leading to the formation of a space-time crystal at the lowest quantum energy state." Because the space-time crystal is already at its lowest quantum energy state, its temporal order – or timekeeping – will theoretically persist even after the rest of our universe reaches entropy, thermodynamic equilibrium or "heat-death." Zhang, who holds the Ernest S. Kuh Endowed Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California (UC) Berkeley, where he also directs the Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center, is the corresponding author of a paper describing this work in Physical Review Letters (PRL). The paper is titled "Space-time crystals of trapped ions." Co-authoring this paper were Tongcang Li, Zhe-Xuan Gong, Zhang-Qi Yin, Haitao Quan, Xiaobo Yin, Peng Zhang and Luming Duan. The concept of a crystal that has discrete order in time was proposed earlier this year by Frank Wilczek, the Nobel-prize winning physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While Wilczek mathematically proved that a time crystal can exist, how to physically realize such a time crystal was unclear. Zhang and his group, who have been working on issues with temporal order in a different system since September 2011, have come up with an experimental design to build a crystal that is discrete both in space and time – a space-time crystal. Papers on both of these proposals appear in the same issue of PRL (September 24, 2012). Ads by Google IIT JEE Syllabus - Video Lectures of Complete IIT JEE Syllabus By IITians. Order Free DVD - KaySonsEducation.co.in Traditional crystals are 3D solid structures made up of atoms or molecules bonded together in an orderly and repeating pattern. Common examples are ice, salt and snowflakes. Crystallization takes place when heat is removed from a molecular system until it reaches its lower energy state. At a certain point of lower energy, continuous spatial symmetry breaks down and the crystal assumes discrete symmetry, meaning that instead of the structure being the same in all directions, it is the same in only a few directions. "Great progress has been made over the last few decades in exploring the exciting physics of low-dimensional crystalline materials such as two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional nanotubes, and zero-dimensional buckyballs," says Tongcang Li, lead author of the PRL paper and a post-doc in Zhang's research group. "The idea of creating a crystal with dimensions higher than that of conventional 3D crystals is an important conceptual breakthrough in physics and it is very exciting for us to be the first to devise a way to realize a space-time crystal." Just as a 3D crystal is configured at the lowest quantum energy state when continuous spatial symmetry is broken into discrete symmetry, so too is symmetry breaking expected to configure the temporal component of the space-time crystal. Under the scheme devised by Zhang and Li and their colleagues, a spatial ring of trapped ions in persistent rotation will periodically reproduce itself in time, forming a temporal analog of an ordinary spatial crystal. With a periodic structure in both space and time, the result is a space-time crystal. "While a space-time crystal looks like a perpetual motion machine and may seem implausible at first glance," Li says, "keep in mind that a superconductor or even a normal metal ring can support persistent electron currents in its quantum ground state under the right conditions. Of course, electrons in a metal lack spatial order and therefore can't be used to make a space-time crystal." Li is quick to point out that their proposed space-time crystal is not a perpetual motion machine because being at the lowest quantum energy state, there is no energy output. However, there are a great many scientific studies for which a space-time crystal would be invaluable. "The space-time crystal would be a many-body system in and of itself," Li says. "As such, it could provide us with a new way to explore classic many-body questions physics question. For example, how does a space-time crystal emerge? How does time translation symmetry break? What are the quasi-particles in space-time crystals? What are the effects of defects on space-time crystals? Studying such questions will significantly advance our understanding of nature." Peng Zhang, another co-author and member of Zhang's research group, notes that a space-time crystal might also be used to store and transfer quantum information across different rotational states in both space and time. Space-time crystals may also find analogues in other physical systems beyond trapped ions. "These analogs could open doors to fundamentally new technologies and devices for variety of applications," he says. Xiang Zhang believes that it might even be possible now to make a space-time crystal using their scheme and state of the art ion traps. He and his group are actively seeking collaborators with the proper ion-trapping facilities and expertise. "The main challenge will be to cool an ion ring to its ground state," Xiang Zhang says. "This can be overcome in the near future with the development of ion trap technologies. As there has never been a space-time crystal before, most of its properties will be unknown and we will have to study them. Such studies should deepen our understandings of phase transitions and symmetry breaking."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-clock-space-time-crystal.html#jCp
A space-time crystal, however, has only existed as a concept in the minds of theoretical scientists with no serious idea as to how to actually build one – until now. An international team of scientists led by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has proposed the experimental design of a space-time crystal based on an electric-field ion trap and the Coulomb repulsion of particles that carry the same electrical charge. "The electric field of the ion trap holds charged particles in place and Coulomb repulsion causes them to spontaneously form a spatial ring crystal," says Xiang Zhang, a faculty scientist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division who led this research. "Under the application of a weak static magnetic field, this ring-shaped ion crystal will begin a rotation that will never stop. The persistent rotation of trapped ions produces temporal order, leading to the formation of a space-time crystal at the lowest quantum energy state." Because the space-time crystal is already at its lowest quantum energy state, its temporal order – or timekeeping – will theoretically persist even after the rest of our universe reaches entropy, thermodynamic equilibrium or "heat-death." Zhang, who holds the Ernest S. Kuh Endowed Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California (UC) Berkeley, where he also directs the Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center, is the corresponding author of a paper describing this work in Physical Review Letters (PRL). The paper is titled "Space-time crystals of trapped ions." Co-authoring this paper were Tongcang Li, Zhe-Xuan Gong, Zhang-Qi Yin, Haitao Quan, Xiaobo Yin, Peng Zhang and Luming Duan. The concept of a crystal that has discrete order in time was proposed earlier this year by Frank Wilczek, the Nobel-prize winning physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While Wilczek mathematically proved that a time crystal can exist, how to physically realize such a time crystal was unclear. Zhang and his group, who have been working on issues with temporal order in a different system since September 2011, have come up with an experimental design to build a crystal that is discrete both in space and time – a space-time crystal. Papers on both of these proposals appear in the same issue of PRL (September 24, 2012). Ads by Google IIT JEE Syllabus - Video Lectures of Complete IIT JEE Syllabus By IITians. Order Free DVD - KaySonsEducation.co.in Traditional crystals are 3D solid structures made up of atoms or molecules bonded together in an orderly and repeating pattern. Common examples are ice, salt and snowflakes. Crystallization takes place when heat is removed from a molecular system until it reaches its lower energy state. At a certain point of lower energy, continuous spatial symmetry breaks down and the crystal assumes discrete symmetry, meaning that instead of the structure being the same in all directions, it is the same in only a few directions. "Great progress has been made over the last few decades in exploring the exciting physics of low-dimensional crystalline materials such as two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional nanotubes, and zero-dimensional buckyballs," says Tongcang Li, lead author of the PRL paper and a post-doc in Zhang's research group. "The idea of creating a crystal with dimensions higher than that of conventional 3D crystals is an important conceptual breakthrough in physics and it is very exciting for us to be the first to devise a way to realize a space-time crystal." Just as a 3D crystal is configured at the lowest quantum energy state when continuous spatial symmetry is broken into discrete symmetry, so too is symmetry breaking expected to configure the temporal component of the space-time crystal. Under the scheme devised by Zhang and Li and their colleagues, a spatial ring of trapped ions in persistent rotation will periodically reproduce itself in time, forming a temporal analog of an ordinary spatial crystal. With a periodic structure in both space and time, the result is a space-time crystal. "While a space-time crystal looks like a perpetual motion machine and may seem implausible at first glance," Li says, "keep in mind that a superconductor or even a normal metal ring can support persistent electron currents in its quantum ground state under the right conditions. Of course, electrons in a metal lack spatial order and therefore can't be used to make a space-time crystal." Li is quick to point out that their proposed space-time crystal is not a perpetual motion machine because being at the lowest quantum energy state, there is no energy output. However, there are a great many scientific studies for which a space-time crystal would be invaluable. "The space-time crystal would be a many-body system in and of itself," Li says. "As such, it could provide us with a new way to explore classic many-body questions physics question. For example, how does a space-time crystal emerge? How does time translation symmetry break? What are the quasi-particles in space-time crystals? What are the effects of defects on space-time crystals? Studying such questions will significantly advance our understanding of nature." Peng Zhang, another co-author and member of Zhang's research group, notes that a space-time crystal might also be used to store and transfer quantum information across different rotational states in both space and time. Space-time crystals may also find analogues in other physical systems beyond trapped ions. "These analogs could open doors to fundamentally new technologies and devices for variety of applications," he says. Xiang Zhang believes that it might even be possible now to make a space-time crystal using their scheme and state of the art ion traps. He and his group are actively seeking collaborators with the proper ion-trapping facilities and expertise. "The main challenge will be to cool an ion ring to its ground state," Xiang Zhang says. "This can be overcome in the near future with the development of ion trap technologies. As there has never been a space-time crystal before, most of its properties will be unknown and we will have to study them. Such studies should deepen our understandings of phase transitions and symmetry breaking."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-clock-space-time-crystal.html#jCp

Monday, September 24, 2012

New 'Sars-like' coronavirus identified in the UK!

A new respiratory illness similar to the Sars virus that spread globally in 2002 and killed hundreds of people has been identified in a man who is being treated in Britain.

The 49-year-old man, who was transferred to a London hospital by air ambulance from Qatar, is the second person confirmed with the coronavirus.

The first case was a patient in Saudi Arabia who has since died. Officials are still determining what threat the new virus may pose. The World Health Organization has not recommended any travel restrictions.

Prof John Watson, head of the respiratory diseases department at the UK's Health Protection Agency, said: "In the light of the severity of the illness that has been identified in the two confirmed cases, immediate steps have been taken to ensure that people who have been in contact with the UK case have not been infected, and there is no evidence to suggest that they have.

"Further information about these cases is being developed for healthcare workers in the UK, as well as advice to help maintain increased vigilance for this virus."

He said there was no specific evidence of the virus spreading from person to person and he had no advice for the public or returning travellers.

Peter Openshaw, director of the Centre for Respiratory Infection at Imperial College London, told Reuters that at this stage the novel virus looked unlikely to prove a concern, and may well only have been identified due to sophisticated testing techniques.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which includes ones that cause the common cold and Sars (severe acute respiratory syndrome). This new virus is different from any coronaviruses that have previously been identified in humans.

There have been a small number of other cases of serious respiratory illness in the Middle East in the past three months, one of whom was treated in the UK but has since died.

This person's illness is also being investigated, although there is no evidence as yet to suggest that it is caused by the same virus or linked to the current case. No other confirmed cases have been identified to date in the UK.

Sridevi doesn't want her daughter to act in films!

Veteran actress Sridevi, who started her film career as a child artist at the age of four, says she does not want her daughter Jhanvi into movies at this age.

"It is too early for her to come in films. At various events she comes with me as a daughter, as a friend, as I like to take her along. It does not mean all this (movie debut)," Sridevi, who is making her comeback with 'English Vinglish' after fifteen years, said.

Rumour mills were abuzz that Sridevi's elder daughter Jhanvi (around 15 years old) would debut in a Karan Johar film and would also be seen in a Telugu flick, which will be a sequel to Sridevi and Chiranjeevi starrer 'Jagadeka Veerudu Athiloka Sundari'. It was later dubbed in Hindi as 'Aadmi Aur Apsara'.

"It is not that I am trying to push her or she wants to be in limelight. It is unfortunate that people sometimes misunderstand," the actress said.

Sridevi started her career as a child actor at the age of four with the 1967 Tamil movie 'Kandan Karunai' and later acted in many Tamil, Telugu and Malayalam movies. In 1975, she debuted in Hindi cinema with a child role in 'Julie'.

"She (Jhanvi) is studying right now, she is doing well. I don't want to distract her. I would be definitely the last person to want her to get in the industry at this age," she said.

Sridevi established herself as the top actress of the south Indian industry with films like 'Meendum Kokila', 'Moondram Pirai', 'Kshana Kshanam' and others and gave power packed performances in Hindi films including 'Sadma', 'Nagina', 'Mr India', 'Chandni', 'ChaalBaaz', 'Lamhe', 'Khuda Gawah' and 'Judaai'.

"I am very happy that whatever name and fame I have got is due to this industry. I am grateful to the people of the industry and my fans for that. I started working at the age of four, that was a different thing. But now let her (Jhanvi) study properly, she is in class tenth," Sridevi said.

Google Play now allows Indian developers to charge for apps!

Smartphone apps are serious business, though developers of Android apps were left in limbo. In India, developers were only allowed to publish free apps, and this had limited the potential for innovative apps because of lack of incentive. 

Recently, India has made it in to Google's official list of countries where developers can register as certified Google Checkout merchants, thus allowing Indian developers to put out paid apps. 

"The move was overdue for some time now," said Ashish Sinha, founder of Pluggd.in, a website focused on local start-ups. "This will pave the way for creating business models around innovative Apps. Android is big in the Indian smart devices space, and this will help fuel development of the localised Apps, too." 

P R Rajendran, Director of Next Wave Multimedia, a Chennai based company that has published more than ten apps on both Apple iTunes as well as Google Play, said, "We have lived with this condition for some time now where we literally run two companies, and are subject to dual taxation". He added, "This is a welcome move on the part of Google." 

So far, Indian developers needed to go to a country where Google Checkout merchants are allowed, such as the US, and register a local bank account in the name of a US resident, in order to sell apps on the Google Play Store. 

Google has been on a roll in India, with its recent launch of services that were previously unavailable in the country. Earlier this month, Google launched its voice guided turn-by-turn Navigation service in India. Google Maps Navigation makes good use of the long-standing features of Google Maps for mobile. The features include powerful Google search and voice search capabilities, which allow users to find local destinations by typing or speaking an address or business name. 

Voice search on Google Maps Navigation is only available in English yet. Google’s search tools go a distance in assisting the user. For instance, ambiguous queries and words that are misspelled are corrected and clarified without requiring the user to enter an exact address, and the optimal route from origin to destination is quickly calculated. 

Importantly here, although Google Maps app itself is a free download from Google Play and the access to navigation isn’t charged for either, the Google Maps app does require an Internet connection and users are responsible for any mobile data charges they incur while using the app. 

Speaking at the launch of these services, Darren Baker, Product Manager for Google Maps, said, "Our goal in developing Google Maps is to provide users with the most comprehensive and accurate online maps in every country, and to share the features and benefits of Google Maps as widely as we can."

Saturday, September 22, 2012

Investment strategies by experts as Nifty hits 5,700!

Nifty ended the week over 2 per cent up and the Sensex hit fresh highs of 2012 as the market cheered Samajwadi Party Chief Mulayam Singh Yadav's outside support to the UPA government.

Meanwhile, Finance Minister P Chidambaram cut withholding tax to 5 per cent from 20 per cent. The tax cut is for borrowing loans between July 2012 and June 2015. The move is likely to encourage debt refinancing via ECB and is aimed at increasing foreign inflows.

The recent political developments, stimulus packages from global central banks as well as government's thrust on reforms are likely to push the benchmarks to higher levels, say market experts.
 
 "Firstly, there is a bit of short covering still on the technical side. Secondly, Europe is underweight or neutral weight India, despite the fact that we have received a large amount of fund this year. However, I continue to believe that more funds will follow and people will change their underweight stance on India. Therefore, this momentum will definitely continue. Obviously, there would be bouts of profit taking in between, but I see the overall trend up," he said to ET Now.

He is of the view that the best option right now is to start buying on dips in the market.

"You cannot hold cash anymore in your portfolios. If you are looking at sector-specific ideas, then rate cyclicals is what investors should be looking into right now. In this space, we like banks, autos and some of the capital goods companies," he said.

Ashith Kampani, Chairman, Cosmic Mandala15 Securities feels that the government's resolve to move ahead with reforms is a positive signal. "Therefore, whatever correction comes, or has come already, should be viewed as an opportunity for investing into this market," he said to ET Now.

Kampani is of the view Nifty below 5,500 would be a good opportunity to invest and investors should be diversifying from FMCG and pharma stocks into the banks and rate sensitives.

"If you look at the FMCG pack, ITC and HULBSE 0.34 % have been in over held position in many funds. Probably some rotation you might see from those stocks into the public sector banks, something like State Bank of India or some private sector banks like ICICI BankBSE 4.19 % or some financial services company," he said.

"One should look at automobile or capital goods because the moment more and more infrastructure names try to start their projects, they all will start looking good. I have been pretty gung-ho on Larsen & Toubro, I still remain in that. I am pretty positive on State Bank of India and I still remain positive on State Bank of India," he added.

"One of my oldest idea, which has been beaten down to hell, is Jain Irrigation. The stock we started talking at Rs 180 level is around Rs 60 now. They have got the approval to get fresh money, equity, into the company at this level and to me it looks no brainer. In banking sector you can look at Yes Bank which is a midcap idea," Kampani said.

Saifeena to have a register marriage!

Grapevines have it that the B-town's most happening couple, Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor , will have a register marriage.

Talks are that already Saif has already filed an application at the Bandra marriage registrar's office on 12th Sept and also submitted necessary papers for the same.
On the other hand, the court has issued permission for the couple to get married any day, after completion of 30 days from the date of application. So most probably the wedding might take place between 11th Oct and 17th Oct.

Moreover, it is said that Saif's mother Sharmila Tagore is hosting Dawat-e-Walima on October 18 for near and dear ones - a tradition of organising dinner post wedding day in honour of a newly wedded couple.

Some sources are to be believed that Saif and Kareena will sign in their wedding on 16th Oct at Saif's residence in Bandra, by calling in a registrar. But like usual, the concerned parties have not yet come out with official announcement.

Ufff, this suspense over Saifeena's shaadi seems to be still going on and on...

Did you know?

Similar Genes Responsible For Stripes on King Cheetah and Tabby Cats:

 Ever imagined as to how king cheetah and tabby cat share one similar characteristic: stripes? Now most importantly the question is as to how these mammals got their stripes?

A team of scientists surely have an answer to it. They suggest that the genes due to which the cheetah gets its distinctive stripe, similar genes play a role in departing beautiful feature on the tabby cat.
Scientists of the study examined the information provided by HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Alabama, and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research and discovered that same genes were corresponding to the stripes on the cheetah and tabby cat.

Stephen O'Brien, one of the researchers who led the study, said, “Nobody had any idea what the genes were that were involved in these things. When the feline genome became available, we began to look for them”.

The commonly found king cheetah, a type of cheetah, in South Africa has been proposed to be having characteristic stripes, which are of the same kind as that found in tabby cats in Europe.
Further, it was asserted that cat owners prefer to have marks on the tabby cats, while cheetah is made to move out in the wild environment.

Friday, September 21, 2012

Rathore wins gold in Sajjan Singh shooting championship!

Athens Olympics silver medallist Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore won the gold medal in the double trap men's competition at the ninth Sardar Sajjan Singh Sethi Memorial Masters shooting championship on Thursday.

The 42-year-old Rathore shot 141+47 to win the yellow metal, while Mohd Asab (142+44) and Sangram Dahiya (136+43) won the silver and bronze respectively at the Dr Karni Singh Shooting Ranges.

In double trap junior men's competition, Shyaan Masood (130) won the gold medal, while Mohd Shees (114) and Syed Ali Bin Hadi (112) bagged the silver and bronze medals.

In double trap women event, Seema Tomar shot 89 to clinch the gold, while Shreyasi Singh (82) and Varsha Tomar (82) won the silver and bronze respectively.

The competition, which is on invitation on the basis of performances in the last national championship, started with the trap event. The skeet will now take place on Saturday and Sunday, the concluding day of the championship.

The competition will be followed by two set of selection trials in shotgun. The first set of trials will be from September 26 to 29 and the second will be from October 1 to 4.

Purple corn helps cure diabetes, kidney disease!

A compound found in Purple Corn may help in developing future treatments for Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease, scientists have said.

Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most serious complications related to diabetes, often leading to end-stage kidney disease.

Purple corn grown in Peru and Chile is a relative of blue corn, and is rich in anthocyanins (also known as flavonoids), which are reported to have anti-diabetic properties.
 
Scientists from the Department of Food and Nutrition and Department of Biochemistry at Hallym University in Korea investigated the cellular and molecular activity of purple corn anthocyanins (PCA) to determine whether and how it affects the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN).
Their findings suggest that PCA inhibits multiple pathways involved in the development of DN, which may help in developing therapies aimed at type 2 diabetes and kidney disease.

Scientists create atlas of human brain!

A comprehensive atlas of the adult human brain that reveals the activity of genes across the entire organ has been created by scientists.
The map was created from genetic analyses of about 900 specific parts of two "clinically unremarkable" brains donated by a 24-year-old and 39-year-old man, and half a brain from a third man.
Researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle said the atlas will serve as a baseline against which they and others can compare the genetic activity of diseased brains, and so shed light on factors that underlie neurological and psychiatric conditions.
"The human brain is the most complex structure known to mankind and one of the greatest challenges in modern biology is to understand how it is built and organised," said Seth Grant, a professor of molecular neuroscience at Edinburgh University who worked on the map.
"This allows us for the first time to overlay the human genome on to the human brain. It gives us essentially the Rosetta stone for understanding the link between the genome and the brain, and gives us a path forward to decoding how genetic disorders impact and produce brain disease," he said.
The power of the brain arises from its neural wiring, its variety of cells and structures, and ultimately where and when different genes are switched on and off throughout the 3lb lump of flesh.
From more than 100 million measurements on brain pieces, with some only a few cubic millimetres, the scientists found that 84% of all genes are turned on in some part of the organ. Gene activity in next door regions of the cortex, the large wrinkly surface of the brain, was very similar, but distinct from that in lower parts, such as the brain stem.
More detailed analysis of the cortex revealed patterns in gene activity that corresponded to regions with specific roles in the brain, such as movement and sensory functions.
The atlas revealed no major divide in gene activity on the left and right sides of the brain, suggesting that expertise generally handled by one hemisphere, such as language, comes from more subtle differences than the study could spot.
Though both brains came from men of a similar age and ethnicity, the pattern of gene activity was so similar that researchers suspect there may be a common blueprint for the expression of genes in the human brain. Work is now under way on donated tissues from both sexes to check how consistent that genetic blueprint might be among people with healthy brains.
Scientists have constructed similar genetic atlases for rodents in the past, but the shortage of donated human brains, coupled with the destructive nature of the tests, and the 1,000-fold increase in size, meant a human equivalent was more of a challenge.
Writing in the journal Nature, the scientists describe how they first scanned the donated brains and then chopped them into tiny pieces. For each lump, they measured activity levels for all of the 20,000 or so genes in the human genome.
The atlas, which overlays the genetic results on to a 3D image of the brain, is freely available for researchers to use online.
Grant said that future studies will look to connect the genetic brain atlas with other genetic studies or brain scans of abnormal or diseased brains. That could highlight genes that play a role in brain conditions and point the way to drug treatments that dampen down or ramp up gene activity.
Clyde Francks at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands is already using genetic data from the Allen Institute for Brain Science to pinpoint genes that give rise to brain asymmetries in a set of 1,300 Dutch students.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Here is the scientific proof for existence of unicon!!!!!

Worldwide Love Affair

Unicorns are not found in Greek mythology, but rather in accounts of natural history, for Greek writers of natural history were convinced of the reality of the unicorn, which they located in India, a distant and fabulous realm for them. The earliest description is from Ctesias who described them as wild asses, fleet of foot, having a horn a cubit and a half in length and colored white, red and black.Aristotle must be following Ctesias when he mentions two one-horned animals, the oryx (a kind of antelope) and the so-called "Indian ass".Strabo says that in the Caucasus there were one-horned horses with stag-like heads.

Catchy veggie names can make kids eat greens!

Kids seem to have an aversion to eating vegetables, but you can make your child have more greens by using attractive names for healthy foods, according to a new study. Researchers from the Cornell University conducted a couple of studies to explore whether a simple change such as using attractive names would influence kid's consumption of vegetables.

In the first study, plain old carrots were transformed into 'X-ray Vision Carrots' . Over 147 students ranging from 8-11 years old from 5 schools participated in tasting the 'cool new' vegetables. Lunchroom menus were the same except that carrots were added on three consecutive days. On the first and last days, carrots remained unnamed. On the second day, the carrots were served as either 'X-ray Vision Carrots' or 'Food of the Day' . The study found that by changing the carrots to 'X-ray vision carrots' , a whopping 66% were eaten, far greater than the 32% eaten when labelled 'Food of the Day' and 35% eaten when unnamed. In the second study, carrots remained 'X-Ray vision carrots' , broccoli became 'Power Punch Broccoli' and 'Silly Dilly Green Beans' replaced regular old green beans.

Researchers looked at food sales over two months in two neighbouring NYC schools. For the first month, both schools offered unnamed food items, while on the second month carrots, broccoli and green beans were given the more attractive names, only in one of the schools (the treatment school).Of the 1,552 students involved 47.8% attended the treatment school. The results were outstanding: vegetable purchases went up by 99%.

Samsung Galaxy Stellar (Verizon Wireless)!

Samsung may have cornered the high-end smartphone market with the Galaxy S III$249.99 at Amazon Wireless, but not everyone is looking for a big, expensive new device. Many people are still picking up a smartphone to use for the first time. And even plenty of experienced users aren't willing to shell out $200 or more for a new phone every two years. That brings us to the Samsung Galaxy Stellar. It's a perfectly capable smartphone that's free with a two-year contract, and it has a simplified starter mode for first-time smartphone users. Overall it's a stellar deal, but the phone's camera isn't quite out of this world.

here's an empty, side-mounted microSD card slot on the left edge of the phone. My 32 and 64GB SanDisk cards worked fine in it. You also get 1.72GB of free internal storage.

All of our music test files played back except for FLAC, and sound quality was fine over both wired 3.5mm headphones as well as Altec Lansing BackBeat Bluetooth headphones. All test videos played back too, at resolutions up to 1080p, except audio clipped in and out on DivX files.

The 3.2-megapixel camera is the Stellar's low point. Shutter speeds are slow, at 1.1 seconds, and autofocus doesn't lock in until after you press the button to take a picture. The camera actually captures some decent detail, but colors are a bit washed out. More than that, however, there's only so much you can do with a 3-megapixel sensor, and these photos just can't compete against those taken by most other smartphones. Unfortunately, video capture is worse. The Stellar records video at a steady 30 frames per second both indoors and out, but maxes out at a small, lackluster 640-by-480 resolution. There's also a standard 1.3-megapixel front-facing camera for video chat.

If you can deal with the disappointing camera, the Samsung Galaxy Stellar is actually a great choice for Verizon users on a budget. It's a lot more powerful than either the keyboarded LG Enlighten$0.01 at Amazon Wireless or the Pantech Breakout$0.01 at Amazon Wireless, two of Verizon's other low-cost options. The Pantech Marauder is actually a good match spec-wise, and it's a better choice if you want a phone with a physical keyboard. But the Stellar has a sleeker form factor and better battery life, making it the better choice overall. If you're willing to spend some more money, the Motorola Droid Razr M gets you a larger, sharper display and a faster processor for just $100.

Monday, September 17, 2012

Farewell to an American pioneer: Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, given hero's burial at sea as his remains committed to ocean by his widow!

First man on the moon buried at sea today by his widow Carol Given full ceremonial burial by U.S. Navy off the coast of Florida

Emotional memorial service held yesterday at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.
Made history with 1969 Apollo 11 moon landingNeil Armstrong, the first man to set foot on the moon, was buried at sea today with a full military service.

The ashes of the ‘reluctant’ icon of the 1960s Space Race were transported on the guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea and were committed to the Atlantic Ocean.

Yesterday, Armstrong was praised in a memorial service at the National Cathedral as a humble hero who led mankind into space.

As commander of the Apollo 11 mission, Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969.The legendary astronaut was born on August 5, 1930, near Wapakoneta, Ohio.

He went on to work in the military, fighting in the Korean War. Later, he would pilot planes for NASA, and eventually, spacecrafts.

During the historic mission on July 20, 1969, nearly half a billion people tuned in to watch the black and white mission to the moon, where Armstrong, joined by Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, spent some two hours loping around on the eerie grey surface.

He radioed back to Earth the historic news of 'one giant leap for mankind.' 'The sights were simply magnificent, beyond any visual experience that I had ever been exposed to,' Armstrong once said.

The moonwalk marked America's victory in the Cold War space race that began October 4, 1957, with the launch of the Soviet Union's Sputnik 1, a 184-pound satellite that sent shock waves around the world.

Although he had been a Navy fighter pilot, a test pilot for NASA's forerunner and an astronaut, Armstrong never allowed himself to be caught up in the celebrity and glamor of the space program.

'I am, and ever will be, a white socks, pocket protector, nerdy engineer,' he said in February 2000 in one of his rare public appearances. 'And I take a substantial amount of pride in the accomplishments of my profession.'

However, his Apollo 11 moon mission turned out to be Armstrong's last space flight. The following year he was appointed to a desk job, being named NASA's deputy associate administrator for aeronautics in the office of advanced research and technology.

Armstrong, who died last month in Ohio at age 82, walked on the moon in July 1969. 'He's now slipped the bonds of Earth once again, but what a legacy he left,' former Treasury Secretary John Snow told the gathering.

Apollo 11 crewmates Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins and Mercury astronaut John Glenn and about two dozen members of Congress were among the estimated 1,500 people in the cavernous cathedral.

A moon rock that the Apollo 11 astronauts gave the church in 1974 is embedded in one of its stained glass windows.NASA administrator Charles Bolden, a former astronaut, said Armstrong's humility and courage 'lifted him above the stars'.

Bolden read a letter from President Barack Obama saying, 'the imprint he left on the surface of the moon is matched only by the extraordinary mark he left on ordinary Americans'.

Royals unfazed by topless islanders!

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have come face to face with a group of topless South Pacific women and did not bat an eyelid when introduced.
Wearing just a few banana leaves as a makeshift top the group performed a dance with men from their region as they showcased their culture for the royals.
Their exposed breasts are a normal part of life in the Solomon Islands' province of Choiseul, where the women are from, and they happily chatted to William and Kate who seemed completely at ease in their company.
One man among their group had a greeting written in pidgin English painted on his chest for the royals - Welkam Wills and Kate.
The royal couple met the performers when they toured a cultural village exhibition in Honiara, capital of the Solomon Islands, showcasing the unique arts, music and culture found in the nation's nine provinces.
William and Kate were animated and looked relaxed throughout their visit and appeared to have moved on from the furore surrounding the publication of topless pictures of the Duchess, taken while on a private holiday in France last week with William.
A civil action has already been launched by the royals against the French magazine Closer which printed the images and later today the Duke and Duchess will ask France's criminal prosecutors to consider charging the photographer who took the intimate pictures.
The couple's lawyers will make a formal criminal complaint to the prosecutor over an invasion of their privacy, St James's Palace said.
Once the complaint is made, it is up to the prosecutor to investigate and possibly lay charges over the notorious images published last week.